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The operational Effect of Anger and Aggression

The operational Effect of Anger and Aggression

Athletarian Minion
Athletarian Minion

Aggressiveness, also known as the "rage factor", is a complex psychological construct that encompasses various aspects of human aggression. It is defined as an emotion driven by an individual's intrinsic (i.e., genetic) genetic tendency to initiate or engage in violence. According to the General Aggression Model(GAM), the present research explored the interactive relationship of situational factors (i.e., violent video games exposure) and personal characteristics (i.e., personality factors [i.e., neuroticism, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), aggression toward others) on this trait. The results demonstrated that the relation between the two was significantly positive and significant for predicting personal, violent video game play, but not for predicting aggressive behaviors toward others. In contrast, some models suggested that individuals with higher intra-personal cortisol levels are more prone to have aggressive thoughts and actions.

The present study examined the operational effect of anger and hostility by using a sample of college students from a large university setting. Specifically, the researchers measured the extent to which participants indicated they would use aggressive behaviors and measures the impact of violent video games on violent behaviors and aggressive behaviors toward others. Consistent with previous research, we found that there was a significant main effect of anger on Aggression, Favorable/Neutral trait (r = -.6), and the interaction between the two traits and video games; and that there was a significant main effect of video games on Aggressive Behavior, Favorable/Neutral trait (r = -.4), and the interaction between these traits and video games. These results suggest that those who score high on both trait sets (anger and hostility) are more likely to be aggressive in real life situations. However, the research does not directly address the question of whether or not these personality traits are appropriate or even healthy within a working environment.

However, given the hundreds of studies demonstrating that video games have an effect on aggressive thoughts, behaviors, and actions, it is clear that companies should not tolerate their employees to engage in violent video game exposure. Research has shown that children exposed to violent media are often aggressive towards classmates and teachers as adults. As children grow up, many of these same traits are manifested in adulthood. It is time for companies to take aggressive video gaming into consideration when implementing it into workplace environments. Luckily, there are many studies demonstrating that many people do not act violently towards these games in adulthood.